You hired good people so let them get on with it!

As a manager or business owner, one of the biggest responsibilities you have is to assemble a team of skilled and capable employees who can work together to achieve the goals of the organization. But sometimes, as the boss, it can be tempting to micromanage and control every aspect of your team’s work. However, this can actually be counterproductive and limit the potential of your employees.

When you hire good people, it’s important to trust that they have the skills and expertise needed to do their job. By constantly checking in on them, second-guessing their decisions, and imposing unnecessary rules and restrictions, you risk sabotaging their creativity and motivation. This can lead to a decrease in productivity, disengagement, and eventually, high turnover.

So why not let your employees get on with their work and give them the space and resources they need to excel? Here are some reasons why it’s important to trust your team and let them take ownership of their work:

1. Fosters creativity and innovation: When you give your employees a sense of autonomy and ownership over their work, they are more likely to explore new ideas, take risks, and think outside the box. This can lead to innovative solutions and fresh perspectives that can help your business grow and thrive.

2. Builds trust and loyalty: By trusting your employees to do their job, you demonstrate your faith in their abilities and create a sense of mutual respect. This can build a culture of trust and loyalty that can motivate your team to go above and beyond for your company.

3. Increases job satisfaction: When employees feel like they have control over their work and are trusted to make important decisions, they are more likely to feel satisfied in their job. This can lead to higher engagement, better morale, and reduced turnover.

4. Improves productivity: Micromanaging can be a huge time-suck, taking up valuable hours and resources that could be better spent on more important tasks. By letting your employees take ownership of their work, you can free up your time to focus on bigger picture tasks and help your team become more efficient and productive.

In conclusion, hiring good people is only half the battle – you also need to give them the space and trust they need to do their job. By fostering a culture of autonomy, innovation, and mutual respect, you can build a stronger, more engaged team that is motivated to take your business to the next level. So next time you’re tempted to micromanage, remember: you hired good people, so let them get on with it! And you’re free to support the business growth 😉

Here to help you.

No one is just TOO BUSY!

We hear it all the time, don’t we, and sometimes coming from our own mouths!


But what does it actually mean?

Life can be pretty hectic, with noise all around us and demands on our time and attention like never before. The digital world can become overwhelmingly distracting, with notifications pinging incessantly on our devices.

Ultimately though, we are in much greater control than we might think. It is also true that we make time for what is important to us. Or more accurately that which we believe should be important to us. After all, there is (for most of us anyway) nothing more important than our loved ones. But do we always make time for them, or do we succumb to the pings of our other attention seekers?
I often wonder if this is a self-induced state by building our importance so that we attract way more attention than is necessary. Should we instead, be ensuring that we are setting ourselves up better for getting out of the way, and reducing our personal involvement in matters that really do not need us?

It is worth asking yourself what you are currently involved in that you could easily step away from – you may just surprise yourself and your family and friends will thank you.

I haven’t made any New Years resolutions

No specific NY resolution from me

However…

> I will continue to work on personal growth every day.

> I will continue to challenge myself to be an outstanding human being every day.

> I will work diligently on my commitments every day: both business and personal.

> I will work on business development in Trust Partner Services Ltd every day.

> I will declutter my connections. Where I am no longer needed, I will disconnect, making room for fresh engagement.

Wishing everyone a very
rewarding and contentment filled 2023

Happy New Year

Failing is essential.

I grew up thinking that failure was a really bad thing.

It was ingrained in me. I was genuinely scared to be a failure.I’m certain it’s been to my detriment, but I guess I’ll never really know.

Worrying about failure is a really bad use of brain time and curtails trying stuff. I am certain that it holds you back.

As I’ve grown older and wiser I’ve shifted my thinking and reframed stuff to allow more freedom to think, to dream to dare. To dare to fail or succeed and always to learn.

I am definitely bolder as well as balder🤣😜, and I’d also say more creative and flexible.

I have learnt that:

👍🏻It’s ok to be wrong

👍🏻It’s ok to fail

👍🏻It’s ok if others disagree with me

I know who my supporters and detractors are, and I am really careful about the thoughts I allow space and time in my head

I am better today than yesterday, and not as good as I’ll be tomorrow.

Photo by Sebastian Arie Voortman on Pexels.com

Why the right coach is an external coach

I’m not totally sure why we struggle with the notion of embracing coaching as a tool to develop top-quality performance outcomes from key business leaders and teams. It’s my belief that the role of coaching tends to fall to the line managers who generally speaking have little time for coaching and equally have not benefited from investment in personal development to enable them to become good or great coaches.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

My assertion is borne out from personal experiences in both large and small businesses and teams with the emphasis on management over coaching. Too often the managers are wrapped up in the day to day management and they also become too close to the teams and lack objectivity.

The basic premise for coaching is that the coached party has all of the resources available themselves but need external reflection to unlock and enable.

Recent conversations with a current manager have added to my certainty on this issue and the necessity for external coaching to be a part of the support to the manager and the team, keeping the team dynamics intact and ensuring the building of togetherness and cohesion

Need coaching support? Here to help Contact me

Coronavirus and the dispersed workforce

Covid19 & the dispersed workforce

There are it seems, hundreds of different job categories And I dare say that with all the subcategories an order of magnitude more.

The location at which your work is conducted does vary enormously upon the services you are providing, for example in the retail space with the exception of online services it’s very much a brick-and-mortar location and a face to face engagement, therefore, the work location is defined. However, for large swathes of other workers, the location is completely flexible, especially if all you require to carry out your work is a computing device, and telephone capability, plus of course an internet connection.

But it’s not always about what’s possible, because there are so many other factors to consider.

Working in a suitable environment covers a multitude of possibilities, such as having somewhere to sit (or stand) comfortably for several hours, somewhere to sensibly locate your computer, and of course you’ll need nearby power sockets. Decent lighting is also really helpful, as is natural daylight for many. Your location (home say) could be shared during the working day with others which could present challenges to the other or all parties. Some people struggle to work without having others around them, we are after all social creatures! So it’s far from straightforward for many.

Operationally, we know that the advent of cloud services has played a significant role in enabling remote working, but of course, there’s still hardware involved and hardware does occasionally fail, or when coupled with software, get its knickers in a twist and do weird things, causing you to be unable to fulfil your work commitments. Whilst software can usually be triaged and remotely brought back into service, hardware can prove a little more challenging. There are many moving parts to any business including its people, and dispersing the workforce does pose a whole bunch of new challenges, which are surmountable, but not always easily. If you’re able to travel relatively easily to an office location, then it’s an inconvenience to get problems resolved, but more remote workers could find this rather more disruptive.

Given that this is not an exhaustive look at the issues associated with managing a dispersed workforce, it does give us some ideas of the considerations when planning, especially when putting a business continuity plan in place.

So whilst many people have been remote office workers for some time, rolling out a blanket solution isn’t without considerable challenge.

I’m pretty certain that the current covid19 crisis has caught many businesses completely unprepared and realising that it’s not just a technology play.

If I can be of any assistance in your planning or implementation phases, please just shout

Practice (alone) does not make perfect

Like all walks of life – work, sport, school – if you are practicing the wrong things, or the wrong way of doing something, you are simply repeating your errors over and over – frustrating and clearly limiting your success.

So how do you stay on track with the right things to practice? Clearly a good start point is to exercise good self discipline. This is the foundation for any personal development. Thinking that the issue is “not my fault” and the issue is caused by something “out there somewhere” is a sure fire way to have reduced control of your life. The first step therefore is to take control of yourself and your discipline including your thoughts and “self-talk”. Be sure to catch yourself talking positively with a “can do” attitude, and stop the cannot do and self limiting speak.
Finding a good coach is a smart step too – whether this is within your current role or an objective outsider. A good coach understands that as an individual, you already have all the necessary resources available to you, but they are the difference, that makes the difference.
For example, if I’m playing golf and struggling to get the results I desire, it probably makes sense to have a coach watch what I do in order to help reflect the areas for improvement – I recall this very real example where the golf pro explained to me (after watching me for a while) that he saw the problem with my game. He noted that I was trying to hit the ball…. Seemed initially to be a ridiculous comment…on closer inspection however, he was absolutely right. He went on to explain to me that if I swing the club, the club will hit the ball…. He moved my focus away from my desire to knock the ball into next week (and missing badly), into simply swinging the club accurately and all would work out.. On this occasion, I saw an instant improvement, but of course, the challenge is to keep making those improvements regularly and being consistent. This is something that your coach can bring to your performance.
This same coaching approach will produce a similar effect in sales. The challenge is that many sales managers and business owners are not well equipped to fulfill his role, so your best option is to find an external coach and develop the right habits.

Who is coaching you?

never quitWhether you are Jonny Wilkinson, Steph Houghton or Mo Farah, the one thing they all have in common is that they all had, and continue to have support to develop their skills and success – a sports coach – in fact probably several coaches with differing and complementary skills.

How about you? Are you so talented that you don’t need coaching? Maybe it’s more simple than that – you simply lack ambition?

No of course not, It’s none of the above is it….you just haven’t been thinking in these terms have you? But now that we are discussing it, it makes sense doesn’t it? In fact it’s rather more common than most of us might think.

So now you are thinking about it – what will you do differently?

Give me a call now – that’s right be a “do it now” person of action.

Success awaits you – the bold and audacious, I salute you.

Together Everyone achieves More – It’s true

I wonder when, during your busy schedule and heavy demands on your time, you last thought about an old (or current) friend or colleague for whom life has dealt a different set of cards!

We all know that we are enduring a tough downturn in the global economy, and the result for employment numbers is not great. However, pragmatically, times of change often present opportunities albeit that uncovering them is sometimes a little more challenging. Thinking about others is a great way of taking some of the personal stress away – especially when licking your wounds because you’ve not had your best day.

I decided recently, as I was thinking about what I could do to help, that I would use my online presence to assist my friends to raise awareness for them. I decided to dedicate a page of my blog to promoting their profiles and CVs as my part in helping them to secure a new role. Follow this Link to review them

I read an article recently that bemoaned larger “corporates” who were taking the lions share of the available “talent” and I felt compelled to comment that this was not the case. There is an fact a lot of talent available, it just doesn’t shout about it. Their CV might not be the best written in the pile, or they might not use sufficient wow words (my daughter in year 6 has used this descriptor recently) to showcase their capabilities, but it is there.

I would urge you to do a couple of things:

1. Think today (and every day) what little thing can I do to help – and do it

2. Doing what I have always done to recruit will get me the same results I have always got, so think about a small change and look beyond the CV and you might strike gold

But what do I know

I wish you enough

This story was emailed to me by a friend a few years ago, and recently the words “I wish you enough” jumped into my conscious thoughts as I was writing a comment on someone’s blog. I love the story and the meaning, so wanted to take the moment to share it with you here and hope that it resonates with you too.

To my family and friends – I wish you enough

via I wish you enough.